Tag Archives: RV recipes

Pizza Pot Pie

Oh My Goodness!  When I saw this…. I had to share.  It’s from the Food Network.  Love the description: Not a pot pie, not a deep-dish pizza, this dish is its own tasty entity. Enjoy!

Lady E Cooper

Watermelon Feta Mint Skewers

Watermelon Feta Mint Skewers are the easiest appetizer around. Salty Feta compliments sweet watermelon for an appetizer that will please folks of all ages.

IngredientsWatermelon-Feta-Mint-Skewers-2-Bites-of-Bri

  • 4 oz feta cheese, in a block
  • 1/4 of a large watermelon, cubed into bite-sized pieces
  • mint leaves
  • skewers
  • balsamic for drizzling

Instructions

  1. Cube the watermelon into bite sized pieces.
  2. Cube the block of feta.
  3. To assemble, stack the feta and watermelon with a mint leaf in between. Using a skewer or toothpick, skewer the stack.
  4. For added flavor, I used a reduced balsamic vinegar drizzle. This is entirely optional but also entirely delicious so that’s your call. To make the drizzle, add ½ cup balsamic vinegar to a small saucepan and reduce for 3-5 minutes until thickened. Drizzle over the skewers.

From: Bitesofbri.com

Avocado with Garlic Shrimp

Stuffed Avocado with Garlic Shrimp   Avocado with Garlic Shrimp

Ingredients
  • 1 whole medium avocado
  • about 2 cups medium to large shrimp, raw or uncooked frozen (defrost prior to cooking)
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, minced
  • olive oil
  • coarse sea salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • fresh parsley or cilantro, chopped
  • chili powder, optional
Instructions

Half the avocado and take the pit out.

Scrap out most of the meat, leaving a very thin layer to hold up the shell better. Set aside.

Chop up the meat into squares and place in a bowl. With your hands, squish the squares a little bit, to crush some but so that most keep their shape. Set aside.

In a pan, place about 2 tablespoons of olive oil, the minced garlic and the shrimp.

Add a dash of coarse sea salt, and over low heat, cook just until the shrimp turn pink. Do not overcook, or they’ll be dry and hard.

Pour the shrimp with garlic and olive oil into the bowl with the avocado pieces.

Add some chopped parsley or cilantro and mix well. (If you want to incorporate some chili powder for extra flavor, do so now before mixing.)

Spoon the mixture into the avocado shells, sprinkle with some freshly ground pepper, and garnish with additional parsley/cilantro if desired.

Serve immediately. Great as a Paleo meal.

(I added a leftover, hard boiled quail egg as garnish, but it’s not essential to the recipe, of course.)

Author: The Saffron Girl

Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1-2
Serves 1 as a meal, or 2 as an appetizer

 

Baked Sweet Potato Fries

Gas Oven or Convection Oven, these french fries are healthy and tasty! A great alternative to the fried fries.

Baked Sweet Potato Friessweet-potato-fries
(makes 2 servings)

Ingredients

2 lbs sweet potatoes cut into fry shapes
2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped
3 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
Directions

Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
Mix together the coconut oil, honey, rosemary, salt, and black pepper in a large bowl. Stir in the sweet potato fries and toss to coat. Remove the sweet potato fries with a slotted spoon and arrange on a single layer on the prepared baking sheet.
bake until tender (about 45 minutes). turn the oven up to 450F and bake until browned (about 15 minutes).

Recipe from 12tomatoes.com

RV Pantry Staples – The Basics

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My RV Pantry!

RV Pantry Staples – A well thought out pantry makes shopping a breeze. However, stocking your pantry has everything to do with the amount of space available. Consider this list as a great starting place:

Basics-

• Flour (example: white, wheat, etc.)
• Sugar (example: brown, granulated, powdered, etc.)
• Dry pasta (example: spaghetti, shells, elbow, etc.)
• Oil (example: olive, canola, peanut, etc.)
• Vegetables – fresh or dried (example: onions, potatoes, garlic)
• Fruits (dried, canned, fresh)
• Vinegars (apple cider, white,
Balsamic)
• Mayo/Mustard (miracle whip, grey poupon)
• Specialty Sauces (hot sauce, soy sauce, bbq sauce, Worcestershire, ketchup)
• Peanut butter
• Beans (pintos, kidney, black, green)
• Nuts ( peanut, walnuts, pecans)
• Spreads (jellies, jams)
• Canned/Jarred Tomatoes (sauce, stewed, paste, etc.)
• Grains (cornmeal, rice, oats, etc.)
• Bouillon (chicken, beef, vegetable)
• Powdered milk
• Honey, molasses, corn syrup
• Bisquick (or other type of dry coating mix
Other miscellaneous items –
• Meats (assorted canned, dried, frozen)
• Olives (black, green)
• Relish/Pickles (dill, sweet)
• Green Chilies, canned jalapenos
• Salsa/Taco Sauce
• Breads ( assorted fresh & frozen)
• Spices (salt & pepper and all of your favorites)
• Assorted Crackers
• Salad Dressings
• Coffee/Teas
• Dry cereals

For Baking –
• Baking Powder
• Baking Soda
• Extracts (vanilla, lemon, almond, etc.)
• Cornstarch
• Dry Yeast
• Chocolate, Butterscotch chips, etc.
• Dry pudding mixes
• Dry cake mixes/Canned Frosting
Keep in mind that all of these items are subject to your family’s liking. Plus, there are additional items that can be added to personalize your panty needs.
Remember, when it comes to fruits and vegetables, consider dehydrated or freeze-dried foods to cut down on weight and spoilage issues.
Happy RVing!
Lady E Cooper

 


Dutch Oven Cooking

dutch_oven_campfirePart 1 – Any foods cooked in an oven, stove top or crock pot can be cooked in a dutch oven. Whether it’s a meal of chili with beans, roast with vegetables or fried chicken, the dutch oven does a great job. Consider these facts when making that purchase:
• Cast iron vs. aluminum – Cast iron pots are thicker and heavier than its counterpart, aluminum, which results in holding heat better. Aluminum weighs less and requires no ‘curing’ or ‘seasoning’ like cast iron resulting in less maintenance; however, heat is not distributed as evenly as the cast iron. Both metals can be utilized on an open fire, buried in the ground, or used with fire coals and briquettes. Aluminum will sometimes give a chalky flavor to foods, whereas iron gives a smoked flavor. Most veteran dutch oven chefs prefer cast iron as their metal of choice.
• Indoor vs. outdoor – The most popular method of dutch oven cooking is using fire coals or briquettes. Cast iron footed ovens with good fitting lids are best used for outdoors. Flat bottomed ovens are great for outdoor camping stoves or indoor RV stove tops.
• New vs. used – Buying new can be more costly than used however; hunting down the perfect oven may be time consuming. When purchasing used, look for flush fitting lids, footed bottoms that are not cracked, bent or broken. Also, check for thickness of the metal which should be consistent throughout. Areas that are thin can cause uneven cooking and can indicate the life of the oven is short.

Find more blogs like this at AmeriGo RV Club

biscuits4 Part 2 – Successful Dutch oven cooking is acquired through much practice. You know the saying – ‘Practice makes perfect’? I won’t promise perfect, however, these helpful guidelines will certainly get you started in the right direction.
• A standard Dutch oven is usually 4 or 5 inches in depth and serves 3-4 people. It’s best to purchase bigger ovens when needing a large quantity of stew or cooking a giant roast. However, deeper ovens will make baking biscuits, cakes or breads much more difficult because of the space from lid to bottom.
• A standard 10 inch diameter oven serves 3-4 people. 12 on up to 16 inch ovens will cook up plenty of food for a larger family.
• Great tip – Use poultry watering metal pans for building a fire which is usually found in your local farm supply stores with dimensions 16 inches wide and 5 inches deep. Purchases 3 per oven – Start coals in pan #1. 2) Place oven in pan #2 while cooking – the sides of the pan will keep the heat contained and away from blowing winds. Place #3 pan upside down beneath the pan with charcoals, this allows cooking without causing lasting damage to the ground surface.
• Know the temperatures inside your oven – For 325 degrees, just double the ovens number-of-inches of diameter. Example: the 10 inch will require 20 charcoal briquettes – 16 inch diameter will require 32 briquettes. This works best with good quality brand name briquettes that provide even heating. This temperature gaging cannot be achieved successfully using campfire coals.

Methane MadnessPart 3 – With a combination of learning the technique of campfire building along with some great cooking tips, this list of facts will help in getting you on the right track of Dutch oven cooking.
• Leave a “moisture barrier” of at least 1 to 2 inches on top of the oven by not overfilling the pot.
• Cover the Dutch oven with aluminum foil to hold the heat in when you are short of coals or are in a hurry.
• A Dutch oven holds a lot of heat in the sides and lid so move it off of the coals before it is finished cooking and let it finish with just the heat of the pot.
• Add approximately 2 briquettes for every 25 degrees.
• Try not to remove the lid. It helps the Dutch oven operate like a pressure cooker.
• Flip the lid of the Dutch oven over and set it on coals to use it as a frying pan. Cook bacon, sausage, eggs, and pancakes on the lid like you would a frying pan. Or, place upside down on the oven for holding hot coals for added heat.
• If using wood as a heat source – use hardwoods which burn hotter. For example: mesquite, hickory, cedar and oak work best.
• Testing your new skills will be the easiest of all part of all because any recipe that you enjoy using now that’s done by slow cooker, oven or stove top can be easily done in your Dutch oven.

Part 4 – Caring of your oven is an important part of Dutch oven cooking. As far as clean up goes, once you have a well-seasoned oven, cleanup should be easy.
• Line the inside of the Dutch oven with foil to avoid most all of the cleanup.
• Remove food shortly after finished cooking. Not doing so can result in a metal taste.
• Just wipe out with paper towels using just a small amount of water or oil with salt. This will clean without damaging the seasoning.
• Never use soap. It will damage the patina of the Dutch oven and make it stick to food and run the risk of rusting.
• Never pour hot water into a cold oven or cold water into a hot oven as this may crack the oven.
• Never allow oven to sit in water for this will cause rust. Dry quickly or place on heat to dry.
• When not in use, store lid loosely, never tight. Having the lid on tight will cause the oil seasoning to become rancid. Place a few folded paper towels on the inside of the oven or a bit of aluminum foil to keep the lid ajar to allow for a fresh air exchange.
Once you are comfortable with this fun way of cooking, try using multiple Dutch ovens referred to as Stack Cooking. There are many wonderful resources available to learn more about Dutch oven cooking. Whether from your local library or other informational online websites, doing your due diligent on research is important for your success.

This concludes the 4 part series on Dutch Oven Cooking.


RV Centennial Cookbook Winners!

These folks have won a free autographed copy of the RV Centennial Cookbook.  During the Hershey PA RV Show September 10-14th, 2015 – RV Show attendees who came to visit with me at the Redwood RV display had a chance to sign up for 1 of 10 copies that were being given away.  All of the following individuals have been contacted.

  • Ezell Belton
  • Laurie Reed
  • Kathy Bellum
  • Susan Friedman
  • Edward High
  • Gerry Haggerty
  • Deb Miller
  • Dawn Stevens
  • Kathy Moyer
  • R. Day

Congratulations to the winners of this cookbook ‘Give-A-Way’ – Sponsored by: REDWOOD RV – Residential 5th Wheel Vehicles

Photos from the 2014 Hershey RV Show

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RV Kitchen Storage Solutions

Keeping our RV refrigerators packed full of our favorite fresh fruits and vegetables is not realistic due to the high potential of food spoilage. However, there is a way we can stock our pantries with a wider variety of foods that is lighter in weight than canned goods. It is through the simple process of dehydration. By dehydrating we extract moisture from fruits, vegetables and even meats we can get more into a smaller footprint in our RV.

Here are some Dehydrating facts:

  • The most natural way to prevent food from spoiling is through preserving it through dehydration.
  • It is a proven fact that dehydrating your foods saves you money.  Buying in bulk at a Farmers Markets or while it is in season is very cost effective and nothing’s better than organic home grown fruits & vegetables.
  • When done properly, foods can last for months and even years.
  • Reconstituting foods with water or other desired liquids will only take 5 to 20 minutes depending on the temperature of the liquids.
  • It is a perfect option if you are into the healthier lifestyle.

What a wonderful thought – Imagine going out to the campsite after a long week of work at your 8 to 5 job and not having to spend valuable family time going to the grocery store for supplies.  All your food prep has been achieved through dehydration and you bring all your meals with you in your RV in a small footprint of storage.

RV Kitchen Storage Solutions- Getting More Into a Smaller Footprint

Find this and more of my RV kitchen blogs at www.AmeriGoRV.com

 


Sheila’s Cheesy Potato Soup Recipe

Recipe from The RV Centennial Cookbook – Celebrating 100 Years RVing, Page 55

 

Submitted by – Sheila Boggess of Prairie Hill, Texas – In her youth, Sheila camped with neighbors who owned a pop-up RV.  She recalls even now…. her memories of RVing are still her favorites, after all these years.  

Sheila’s Cheesy Potato Soup

Ingredients:

-6 or 7 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
-water to cover potatoes while cooking
-1 pint sour cream (note: using fat-free sour cream does not make the soup as smooth, but it tastes the same and is healthier)
-1 lb. Mexican Velveeta, cubed; regular Velveeta can be used, if preferred
-real bacon bits or crumble several slices of cooked bacon
-green onions (chopped)

Instructions:
Cover peeled, cubed potatoes with water in a large pot or Dutch oven. (Use more water for thinner soup.) When potatoes are tender, add sour cream and cubes of Velveeta. Heat over low heat, stirring nonstop. When cheese is melted, soup is ready. Add green onions and bacon bits just before serving.

 

Note from Lady E Cooper: I personally have made this potato soup many times. Not only does it taste delicious….it is easy for the RV kitchen – only 20 minutes cooking time. Plus, it’s one of my favorites for the cooler months. I hope it will become one of your favorite RV recipes, as well.  My personal tip is to serve this soup up in to your favorite bread bowl… then sit around the campfire to enjoy!

 

The RV Centennial Cookbook is available for purchase on Amazon.com

Reuben Sandwich Recipe

Let’s make GREAT Reuben sandwiches together!!

Reuben2

Photo Source – Google

This is my personal Reuben sandwich Recipe from the deli that I owned and still make them this way today. If you have a nice size flat solid surface griddle for your outside grill, that’s perfect! Or for inside – use an electric griddle.

  •  Reuben sandwiches are typically made with rye bread.  I like to use the marble rye but you can use any type of bread you would like.  (2 slices per sandwich)
  •  My favorite meats to use are:  Thinly sliced Peppered pastrami and lean corned beef – Using one or both – using a ¼ to 1/3 lb per sandwich (I like piling the meats high!)
  •  American Swiss Cheese (2 slices per sandwich) Regular Swiss can be used, too.
  • Sauerkraut -½ cup or a little more– the type of sauerkraut is going to be your personal choice. Mine is Bavarian which has a touch of sweetness with the tart and has caraway seeds. (Yummy!)
  • My favorite dressing is Thousand Island dressing (if you like a little sweet) or Brown Spicy Mustard (if you like it on the tart side) each works well on the Reuben.

On a bigger sized (325 degree) hot griddle….brush with a light coat of oil of your choice (so nothing will stick).  Visually, we are dividing the griddle in thirds. Making one sandwich at a time, place your sauerkraut on first one-third, meat(s) on the middle third and the 2 slices of rye bread on the outer third.  Getting everything piping hot and your bread lightly toasted is our objected.

For assembly: lay a slice of cheese on one slice of grilled bread. Place your HOT sauerkraut down first (on top of the cheese) then add the dressing of choice (my dressings are kept in a squeeze bottle so I can easily apply). Next, add your HOT grilled meats, and then top with the remaining slice of cheese…then another slice of grilled bread.  Leaving the sandwich on the grill a little longer, turning once…allows the cheese to melt into the meat(s) and sauerkraut.  (This forces the moisture from the sauerkraut to stay inside the sandwich and away from the bread) This assembly will need to go fast…so be prepared.  If you see your bread getting too dark then move it off to the side and assemble there…but put back on the grill when totally assembled to heat the cheese. Slice in half and serve.  You will find that this is a tasty way to make Reuben sandwiches …and you will want to serve them often.  Adds chips and a pickle spear and you have a great meal.

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