Pizza Pot Pie

Oh My Goodness!  When I saw this…. I had to share.  It’s from the Food Network.  Love the description: Not a pot pie, not a deep-dish pizza, this dish is its own tasty entity. Enjoy!

Lady E Cooper

“Taking the FEAR Out of RV Maintenance for the RVing Woman!”

March 28, 2016 – It was my honor to host an exclusive webinar recently titled: “Taking the FEAR Out of RV Maintenance for the RVing Woman!” There are a bunch of us out there on America’s highways….doing the RV Lifestyle and struggling when it comes to RV Maintenance – not just getting it done but financing it, too.

I was joined by my guest –  Dawn Hernandez and Lisa Norman, both who are recent graduates of the RV Maintenance Triad Training class in Texas recently .  Just a little tid-bit of info about my guests….they both decided to take the course instead of their husbands. Listen in to the recording below to find out why …..and how this experience has enhanced their outlook on living and working in the RV Lifestyle. Plus, learn how you can be a part of this wonderful experience.

Meet Dawn! New graduate of the 5 Day Hands-On RV Maintenance Triad Training class in Texas!

Meet Dawn! New graduate of the 5 Day Hands-On RV Maintenance Class in Texas!

#RV Maintenance #Women RVers, #RV Maintenance for Ladies

Meet Elisa! New graduate from the 5 Day Hands-On RV Maintenance Triad Training class in Texas.

Could this be YOU?

How to Eat an Avocado Seed


Among all the goodness within each avocado seed is said to be:

  • 70% of the antioxidants found in the whole avocado, which help to regulate intestinal function
  • More soluble fiber than most other rich sources
  • Oils that increase the collagen in our skin, assisting with wrinkles and keeps our hair shiny

Unfortunately, though, it usually does end up in the garbage. It’s extremely bitter taste probably has a lot to do with that… but there’s so much benefit to be had by eating it, so it’s worth investigating how we might go about it.

Eating the avocado seed is not only a great way to get extra nutrients in to your diet, but also a great way to minimize waste – I love the idea of using more of a food in cooking than what gets thrown away!

Read more about how awesome the avocado seed is here.

Ok then… how on earth do I eat it?

The easiest way to eat the seed is to dehydrate it (to increase it’s shelf life), and then grind it in to a powder to be added to smoothies and juices.

That way, we can add lots of lovely strong flavors to mask the bitterness of the seed. Good choices to do this are tart berries, ginger and citrus.

How do I make the powder?

  1. Remove the seed as you normally would – tap a sharp knife into it, and twist.
  2. Rinse the seed, then place in an oven pan and dehydrate the seed at 120C for 1.5 – 2 hours.
  3. Once the seed has cooled to the touch, discard the dry outer skin. Then find the seam created by your knife when you removed your seed, and gently press your knife down in to it. The seed should pop into two halves. Be sure to spread your fingers on your free hand when you do this, in case the seed rolls.
  4. Using a sharp knife, dice the seed halves. Still ensure your fingers are kept away, just in case.
  5. Using a high powdered blender (a Vitamix is ideal), blitz the diced seed into a fine powder.
  6. Store in the fridge in an air tight container, and use a tablespoon at a time for your smoothies and juices.


Read the full article at:

Texas Regional Rally Attendeess March 2016


March 2016 – Our month started strong with the Professor & I putting on a ‘New Hat’ as Rally Coordinators ….over the first-ever Redwood / CrossRoads RV Regional Rally. In the beautiful Mill Creek Ranch RV Resort in Canton, TX with 10 rigs in attendance…just happened to be all Redwood 5th wheels which was a beautiful sight. A shout out to all those who came to make history. We thank you all so much from the bottom of our hearts.

Texas Regional Rally Attendeess March 2016We had folks come as far away as Kansas ….and as close as 30 miles down the road at Lake Fork, TX. Everyone’s enthusiasm was amazing….even with the major rains that fell early ….but we finished with sunshiny skies and gentle winds. Here are a few photos from our event.

Redwood Line Up More Redwood 5th Wheels3 days before the Rally, the attendees who chose to come early to do a 3 Day RV Maintenance class called “Mastering Your RV” taught by the one and only Professor Terry Cooper, the Texas RV Professor. It’s important to learn what we call the foundation subjects like ….the 3 RV Electrical Systems, Propane System and the RV Water Systems. We also touched on RV refrigerators, RV water heaters, RV air conditioning and RV furnace. It would not be complete without RV exteriors.

Outside hands-on learning about RV Batteries and other parts of the RV.

Classroom theory training.

Words from Deborah & Larry H. who attended the RV maintenance class with their thoughts.

Friday we were out on the town at Dairy Palace for those World Famous Hamburgers! What a treat along with Blue Bell ice cream!


Dairy Palace – Home of the World Famous Hamburgers!


A lot of happy RVers for sure!!!

20160311_124616While we were not eating…. we were being educated by Ron Russell from Trailer Performance Braking and Tires. With more from Terry Cooper on the Amazing RV Refrigerator.


Seminar – Amazing RV Refrigerator

Food, food and lots of it!!

and….Food, Food and Lots of it!!

Proud wearers of the Rally T-Shirts provided by Redwood / CrossRoads RV

We want to thank CrossRoads RV & Redwood RV for sponsoring this event and providing a delicious meal on Saturday noon catered by Baker’s Ribs Cafe in Canton, TX. Everyone agrees that the most scrumptious Fried Pies provided by The Original Fried Pie Shop were a real treat.

The orginial fried pie shop in Canton, TXThis event was the first of 6 Regional Rallies that the Professor & I will be at during the coming months of 2016. Next stop….. Tucson, AZ.



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Watermelon Feta Mint Skewers

Watermelon Feta Mint Skewers are the easiest appetizer around. Salty Feta compliments sweet watermelon for an appetizer that will please folks of all ages.


  • 4 oz feta cheese, in a block
  • 1/4 of a large watermelon, cubed into bite-sized pieces
  • mint leaves
  • skewers
  • balsamic for drizzling


  1. Cube the watermelon into bite sized pieces.
  2. Cube the block of feta.
  3. To assemble, stack the feta and watermelon with a mint leaf in between. Using a skewer or toothpick, skewer the stack.
  4. For added flavor, I used a reduced balsamic vinegar drizzle. This is entirely optional but also entirely delicious so that’s your call. To make the drizzle, add ½ cup balsamic vinegar to a small saucepan and reduce for 3-5 minutes until thickened. Drizzle over the skewers.


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Avocado with Garlic Shrimp

Stuffed Avocado with Garlic Shrimp   Avocado with Garlic Shrimp

  • 1 whole medium avocado
  • about 2 cups medium to large shrimp, raw or uncooked frozen (defrost prior to cooking)
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, minced
  • olive oil
  • coarse sea salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • fresh parsley or cilantro, chopped
  • chili powder, optional

Half the avocado and take the pit out.

Scrap out most of the meat, leaving a very thin layer to hold up the shell better. Set aside.

Chop up the meat into squares and place in a bowl. With your hands, squish the squares a little bit, to crush some but so that most keep their shape. Set aside.

In a pan, place about 2 tablespoons of olive oil, the minced garlic and the shrimp.

Add a dash of coarse sea salt, and over low heat, cook just until the shrimp turn pink. Do not overcook, or they’ll be dry and hard.

Pour the shrimp with garlic and olive oil into the bowl with the avocado pieces.

Add some chopped parsley or cilantro and mix well. (If you want to incorporate some chili powder for extra flavor, do so now before mixing.)

Spoon the mixture into the avocado shells, sprinkle with some freshly ground pepper, and garnish with additional parsley/cilantro if desired.

Serve immediately. Great as a Paleo meal.

(I added a leftover, hard boiled quail egg as garnish, but it’s not essential to the recipe, of course.)

Author: The Saffron Girl

Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1-2
Serves 1 as a meal, or 2 as an appetizer


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Baked Sweet Potato Fries

Gas Oven or Convection Oven, these french fries are healthy and tasty! A great alternative to the fried fries.

Baked Sweet Potato Friessweet-potato-fries
(makes 2 servings)


2 lbs sweet potatoes cut into fry shapes
2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped
3 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
Mix together the coconut oil, honey, rosemary, salt, and black pepper in a large bowl. Stir in the sweet potato fries and toss to coat. Remove the sweet potato fries with a slotted spoon and arrange on a single layer on the prepared baking sheet.
bake until tender (about 45 minutes). turn the oven up to 450F and bake until browned (about 15 minutes).

Recipe from

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RV Pantry Staples – The Basics


My RV Pantry!

RV Pantry Staples – A well thought out pantry makes shopping a breeze. However, stocking your pantry has everything to do with the amount of space available. Consider this list as a great starting place:


• Flour (example: white, wheat, etc.)
• Sugar (example: brown, granulated, powdered, etc.)
• Dry pasta (example: spaghetti, shells, elbow, etc.)
• Oil (example: olive, canola, peanut, etc.)
• Vegetables – fresh or dried (example: onions, potatoes, garlic)
• Fruits (dried, canned, fresh)
• Vinegars (apple cider, white,
• Mayo/Mustard (miracle whip, grey poupon)
• Specialty Sauces (hot sauce, soy sauce, bbq sauce, Worcestershire, ketchup)
• Peanut butter
• Beans (pintos, kidney, black, green)
• Nuts ( peanut, walnuts, pecans)
• Spreads (jellies, jams)
• Canned/Jarred Tomatoes (sauce, stewed, paste, etc.)
• Grains (cornmeal, rice, oats, etc.)
• Bouillon (chicken, beef, vegetable)
• Powdered milk
• Honey, molasses, corn syrup
• Bisquick (or other type of dry coating mix
Other miscellaneous items –
• Meats (assorted canned, dried, frozen)
• Olives (black, green)
• Relish/Pickles (dill, sweet)
• Green Chilies, canned jalapenos
• Salsa/Taco Sauce
• Breads ( assorted fresh & frozen)
• Spices (salt & pepper and all of your favorites)
• Assorted Crackers
• Salad Dressings
• Coffee/Teas
• Dry cereals

For Baking –
• Baking Powder
• Baking Soda
• Extracts (vanilla, lemon, almond, etc.)
• Cornstarch
• Dry Yeast
• Chocolate, Butterscotch chips, etc.
• Dry pudding mixes
• Dry cake mixes/Canned Frosting
Keep in mind that all of these items are subject to your family’s liking. Plus, there are additional items that can be added to personalize your panty needs.
Remember, when it comes to fruits and vegetables, consider dehydrated or freeze-dried foods to cut down on weight and spoilage issues.
Happy RVing!
Lady E Cooper


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Dutch Oven Cooking

dutch_oven_campfirePart 1 – Any foods cooked in an oven, stove top or crock pot can be cooked in a dutch oven. Whether it’s a meal of chili with beans, roast with vegetables or fried chicken, the dutch oven does a great job. Consider these facts when making that purchase:
• Cast iron vs. aluminum – Cast iron pots are thicker and heavier than its counterpart, aluminum, which results in holding heat better. Aluminum weighs less and requires no ‘curing’ or ‘seasoning’ like cast iron resulting in less maintenance; however, heat is not distributed as evenly as the cast iron. Both metals can be utilized on an open fire, buried in the ground, or used with fire coals and briquettes. Aluminum will sometimes give a chalky flavor to foods, whereas iron gives a smoked flavor. Most veteran dutch oven chefs prefer cast iron as their metal of choice.
• Indoor vs. outdoor – The most popular method of dutch oven cooking is using fire coals or briquettes. Cast iron footed ovens with good fitting lids are best used for outdoors. Flat bottomed ovens are great for outdoor camping stoves or indoor RV stove tops.
• New vs. used – Buying new can be more costly than used however; hunting down the perfect oven may be time consuming. When purchasing used, look for flush fitting lids, footed bottoms that are not cracked, bent or broken. Also, check for thickness of the metal which should be consistent throughout. Areas that are thin can cause uneven cooking and can indicate the life of the oven is short.

Find more blogs like this at AmeriGo RV Club

biscuits4 Part 2 – Successful Dutch oven cooking is acquired through much practice. You know the saying – ‘Practice makes perfect’? I won’t promise perfect, however, these helpful guidelines will certainly get you started in the right direction.
• A standard Dutch oven is usually 4 or 5 inches in depth and serves 3-4 people. It’s best to purchase bigger ovens when needing a large quantity of stew or cooking a giant roast. However, deeper ovens will make baking biscuits, cakes or breads much more difficult because of the space from lid to bottom.
• A standard 10 inch diameter oven serves 3-4 people. 12 on up to 16 inch ovens will cook up plenty of food for a larger family.
• Great tip – Use poultry watering metal pans for building a fire which is usually found in your local farm supply stores with dimensions 16 inches wide and 5 inches deep. Purchases 3 per oven – Start coals in pan #1. 2) Place oven in pan #2 while cooking – the sides of the pan will keep the heat contained and away from blowing winds. Place #3 pan upside down beneath the pan with charcoals, this allows cooking without causing lasting damage to the ground surface.
• Know the temperatures inside your oven – For 325 degrees, just double the ovens number-of-inches of diameter. Example: the 10 inch will require 20 charcoal briquettes – 16 inch diameter will require 32 briquettes. This works best with good quality brand name briquettes that provide even heating. This temperature gaging cannot be achieved successfully using campfire coals.

Methane MadnessPart 3 – With a combination of learning the technique of campfire building along with some great cooking tips, this list of facts will help in getting you on the right track of Dutch oven cooking.
• Leave a “moisture barrier” of at least 1 to 2 inches on top of the oven by not overfilling the pot.
• Cover the Dutch oven with aluminum foil to hold the heat in when you are short of coals or are in a hurry.
• A Dutch oven holds a lot of heat in the sides and lid so move it off of the coals before it is finished cooking and let it finish with just the heat of the pot.
• Add approximately 2 briquettes for every 25 degrees.
• Try not to remove the lid. It helps the Dutch oven operate like a pressure cooker.
• Flip the lid of the Dutch oven over and set it on coals to use it as a frying pan. Cook bacon, sausage, eggs, and pancakes on the lid like you would a frying pan. Or, place upside down on the oven for holding hot coals for added heat.
• If using wood as a heat source – use hardwoods which burn hotter. For example: mesquite, hickory, cedar and oak work best.
• Testing your new skills will be the easiest of all part of all because any recipe that you enjoy using now that’s done by slow cooker, oven or stove top can be easily done in your Dutch oven.

Part 4 – Caring of your oven is an important part of Dutch oven cooking. As far as clean up goes, once you have a well-seasoned oven, cleanup should be easy.
• Line the inside of the Dutch oven with foil to avoid most all of the cleanup.
• Remove food shortly after finished cooking. Not doing so can result in a metal taste.
• Just wipe out with paper towels using just a small amount of water or oil with salt. This will clean without damaging the seasoning.
• Never use soap. It will damage the patina of the Dutch oven and make it stick to food and run the risk of rusting.
• Never pour hot water into a cold oven or cold water into a hot oven as this may crack the oven.
• Never allow oven to sit in water for this will cause rust. Dry quickly or place on heat to dry.
• When not in use, store lid loosely, never tight. Having the lid on tight will cause the oil seasoning to become rancid. Place a few folded paper towels on the inside of the oven or a bit of aluminum foil to keep the lid ajar to allow for a fresh air exchange.
Once you are comfortable with this fun way of cooking, try using multiple Dutch ovens referred to as Stack Cooking. There are many wonderful resources available to learn more about Dutch oven cooking. Whether from your local library or other informational online websites, doing your due diligent on research is important for your success.

This concludes the 4 part series on Dutch Oven Cooking.

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RV Centennial Cookbook Available On Amazon

The RV Centennial Cookbook – Celebrating 100 Years of RVing will be the perfect gift for that special someone (who LOVES to RV) this Christmas or anytime of the year.  I have GREAT NEWS!!! My RV cookbook is now available on Amazon.  Containing 100 featured recipes – this beautiful publication has 5 methods of cooking ranging from the campfire to the RV oven. Fun and simple recipes that insure lots of enjoyments while out on the road and in nature.  Featuring historical RV photos,  maintenance tips from the RV Professor, stories from many people who have made RVing part of their history.  This is a true celebration of 100 years of RVing.  Please see inside the book by clicking on the book photo.

This truly is a gift that he or she will reach for over and over again – and they will think of you and your thoughtfulness as they enjoy each recipe.  RVing is absolutely about….. ‘Family, Friends & Food’!

Thank you……Happy RVing!

Lady E Cooper